Cloud – Tech-Coffee https://www.tech-coffee.net Mon, 28 Jan 2019 11:07:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.11 65682309 Create a Hub-and-Spoke topology with Azure Virtual Network Peering https://www.tech-coffee.net/virtual-network-peering/ https://www.tech-coffee.net/virtual-network-peering/#comments Mon, 28 Jan 2019 11:07:41 +0000 https://www.tech-coffee.net/?p=6705 Currently I’m working on AZ-102 certification and I wanted to share with you a small lab I created to try Azure virtual network and especially remote gateway. To create a Hub-and-Spoke topology, you need that each spoke virtual network communicates through the hub virtual network. To implement this kind of solution, you need several virtual ...

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Currently I’m working on AZ-102 certification and I wanted to share with you a small lab I created to try Azure virtual network and especially remote gateway. To create a Hub-and-Spoke topology, you need that each spoke virtual network communicates through the hub virtual network. To implement this kind of solution, you need several virtual networks and peering. I would like to implement the following solution:

All VMs must be able to communicate through NE01-VMProject1 which is the hub. A peering will be established between NE01-NET – NE02-NET and NE01-NET – NE03-NET. To prepare this topic, I’ve already created the following resources:

  • Resource groups
  • Virtual machines
  • Virtual networks

As you can see below, the VM NE01VM1 is connected to NE01-NET virtual network with the IP 10.11.0.4.

The VM NE02VM1 is connected to NE02-NET virtual network with the IP 10.12.0.4.

Because no peering is created, a VM cannot ping another:

Create the peering

First, I edit Peerings from NE02-NET.

I call it NE02-NET-NE01-NET and I select the virtual network NE01-NET. For the moment, I leave default configuration.

From NE01-NET virtual network, I do the same thing to peer it to NE02-NET. I leave also the default configuration for the moment.

When peers are created, you should get the peering status to Connected.

Now, VM from NE01-VMProject1 and NE02-VMProject2 are able to communicate:

So, I create the peers between NE03-VMProject3 and NE01-VMProject1. I repeat the same steps as previously. I create a peer from NE01-NET to connect to NE03-NET.

Then I create a peer from NE03-NET to connect to NE01-NET.

From this point, VMs from NE03-VMProject3 are able to communicate with NE01-VMProject1 VMs and VMs from NE02-VMProject2 can ping VM from NE01-VMProject1. However, VM from NE03-VMProject3 can’t communicate with NE02-VMProject2 because gateway and routes are missing:

Create virtual gateway and route tables

First, create a virtual gateway in your hub network (NE01-NET) with the following settings. The gateway takes the 4th IP address in gateway subnet. You need this information for later. So, in this example, the internal IP address of this virtual network gateway is 10.11.1.4.

Then in NE02-VMProject2 and NE03-VMProject3, create a route table resource with the following settings:

Now, navigate in route table resource and click on Routes. Click on Add.

Configure the route as the following:

Route Name Address prefix Next hop type Next hop address
NE02-NET-ROUTE To-NE03-NET 10.13.0.0/16 Virtual appliance 10.11.1.4
NE03-NET-ROUTE To-NE02-NET 10.12.0.0/16 Virtual appliance 10.11.1.4

Now, click on Subnet and Associate.

Associate the NE02-NET-ROUTE to NE02-NET virtual network and NE03-NET-ROUTE to NE03-NET.

Configure hub peers

Now we need to allow gateway transit in each hub peer. Open each peering configuration in NE01-NET and Allow gateway transit as below.

Configure spoke peers

In each spoke peer (NE02-NET and NE03-NET), enable Use remote gateways option.

Wait a few minutes and then all VMs should be able to communicate.

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Deploy Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 https://www.tech-coffee.net/deploy-azure-stack-technical-preview-1/ https://www.tech-coffee.net/deploy-azure-stack-technical-preview-1/#comments Sat, 30 Jan 2016 21:20:23 +0000 https://www.tech-coffee.net/?p=4396 Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 has been released by Microsoft this January, 29th 2016. Azure Stack brings Microsoft Azure technologies in your Datacenter. The user experience of Azure Stack is the same as the new Microsoft Azure portal. Moreover, you can use the same JSON template in Microsoft Azure and Azure Stack to deploy Azure ...

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Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 has been released by Microsoft this January, 29th 2016. Azure Stack brings Microsoft Azure technologies in your Datacenter. The user experience of Azure Stack is the same as the new Microsoft Azure portal. Moreover, you can use the same JSON template in Microsoft Azure and Azure Stack to deploy Azure resources (for further information about JSON template, you can read this topic).

The Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 provides an Azure Stack Proof of Concept (POC) that has to be deployed on a single node. The node must meet the following hardware requirements:

Component

Minimum

Recommended

Compute: CPU

Dual-Socket: 12 Physical Cores

Dual-Socket: 16 Physical Cores

Compute: Memory

96 GB RAM

128 GB RAM

Compute: BIOS

Hyper-V Enabled (with SLAT support)

Hyper-V Enabled (with SLAT support)

Network: NIC

Windows Server 2012 R2 Certification required for NIC; no specialized features required

Windows Server 2012 R2 Certification required for NIC; no specialized features required

Disk drives: Operating System

1 OS disk with minimum of 200 GB available for system partition (SSD or HDD)

1 OS disk with minimum of 200 GB available for system partition (SSD or HDD)

Disk drives: General Azure Stack POC Data

4 disks. Each disk provides a minimum of 140 GB of capacity (SSD or HDD).

4 disks. Each disk provides a minimum of 250 GB of capacity.

HW logo certification

Certified for Windows Server 2012 R2

Certified for Windows Server 2012 R2

The Operating System of this node must be Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 4 with the latest updates installed, including KB 3124262. Just one NIC must be enabled on this host otherwise you will have an error when you will run the Azure Stack POC deployment.

To finish, you need a valid Microsoft Azure subscription with an Azure Active Directory.

Azure Stack POC architecture overview

The script provided in the Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 setup, deploy and configure some VMs. Below you can find the usage of each VM. The schema and the description are copied from this Microsoft topic.

  • ADVM Virtual machine that hosts Active Directory, DNS, and DHCP services for Microsoft Azure Stack. These infrastructure foundational services are required to bring up the Azure Stack as well as the ongoing maintenance.
  • ACSVM Virtual machine that hosts the Azure Consistent Storage services. These services run on the Service Fabric on a dedicated virtual machine.
  • MuxVM Virtual machine that hosts the Microsoft software load balancer component and network multiplexing services.
  • NCVM Virtual machine that hosts the Microsoft network controller component, which is a key component of the Microsoft software-defined networking technology. These services run on the Service Fabric on this dedicated virtual machine.
  • NATVM Virtual machine that hosts the Microsoft network address translation component. This enables outbound network connectivity from Microsoft Azure Stack.
  • xRPVM Virtual machine that hosts the core resource providers of Microsoft Azure Stack, including the Compute, Network, and Storage resource providers.
  • SQLVM Virtual machine that hosts SQL Servers which is used by various fabric services (ACS and xRP services).
  • PortalVM Virtual machine that hosts the Control Plane (Azure Resource Manager) and Azure portal services and various experiences (including services supporting admin experiences and tenant experiences).
  • ClientVM Virtual machine that is available to developers for installing PowerShell, Visuall Studio, and other tools.

Storage services in the operating system on the physical host include:

  • CS Blob Service Azure Consistent Storage Blob service, which provides blob and table storage services. SoFS Scale-out File Server. ReFS CSV Resilient File System Cluster Shared Volume.Virtual DiskStorage Space, and Storage Spaces Direct are the respective underlying storage technology in Windows Server to enable the Microsoft Azure Stack core storage resource provider.

Deploy Azure Stack POC in your Datacenter

To try Azure Stack, I have the following computer:

  • 2x Intel Xeon E6-2620v2
  • 128GB of DDR3 ECC Registered
  • 1x SSD Intel 128GB for Operating System
  • 1x SSD Samsung 840 EVO 512GB to store VMs
  • 4x SSD Crucial MX100 512GB for Azure Stack General Data

I have a fresh install of Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 4 with the last update. Below you have the details about the compute resources of my server:

I have only enabled one NIC with Internet access. I have a direct Internet access without Proxy.

Then I have 6 SSD. One stores the Operating System, another will host VM and the others are just online without partition (in RAW).

Once your hardware is ready, you can download the Azure Stack Technical Preview 1 from this link. When you have run the setup, you should have the following files:

Now open a PowerShell in RunAs administrator and execute the script called DeployAzureStack.ps1. This script checks prerequisites. If something is wrong with your configuration, you will have an error. Then a password will be asked for the built-in administrator.

Then you have to enter the credential of your Microsoft Azure subscription to connect to your Azure Active Directory.

If you have several directories, you can choose one of them.

Then the deployment is starting. It can take about four hours, depending of your configuration, to finish the deployment. Moreover, I have had several reboots of my server. Each time I’m logged on with local administrator and the script has started where it was stopped.

Then several VMs are deployed and configured.

Once the deployment is finished, you can connect to the client VM by using the RDP files copied on your desktop.

Then you can run the HTML link called Microsoft Azure Stack POC Portal. To logon to your Azure Stack, specify the Microsoft Azure credential.

And tadaa, you have Azure Stack in your datacenter. In next topic, I will speak about some configuration of Azure Stack J.

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Begin Azure IaaS – Prepare your Environment https://www.tech-coffee.net/begin-azure-iaas-prepare-your-environment/ https://www.tech-coffee.net/begin-azure-iaas-prepare-your-environment/#respond Mon, 02 Nov 2015 17:37:34 +0000 https://www.tech-coffee.net/?p=3979 1 – Introduction This article presents how to prepare an environment in Azure IaaS (Resource Group, Cloud Service, VMNET, VM …) from the beginning and explain Azure basic concept: creation of all required resources (Resource Group, Storage account, Cloud Services). configuration of a Virtual Network (VNET) with multiple subnet. configuration of VPN Gateway (Point-to-site VPN) for ...

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1 – Introduction

This article presents how to prepare an environment in Azure IaaS (Resource Group, Cloud Service, VMNET, VM …) from the beginning and explain Azure basic concept:

  • creation of all required resources (Resource Group, Storage account, Cloud Services).
  • configuration of a Virtual Network (VNET) with multiple subnet.
  • configuration of VPN Gateway (Point-to-site VPN) for client connection and certificate configuration.
  • use of Azure PowerShell.
  • VM creation with multiple vNIC and VHDX.
  • deploy a simple AD Forest.

 

 

 

 

For the demonstration I will used the architecture that I prepare to test the StarWind Virtual SAN product.

For more information see my other article:
SQL AlwaysOn FCI (Failover Cluster Instance) in IaaS Azure Cloud with StarWind Virtual SAN Solution

Overview of Architecture:

Schema - Azure - SQL AlwaysOn FCI & Virtual SAN - OverviewThe environment will be composed:

  • 1x Azure subscription (for reminder you can create a trial account with 150€ available for 30 days).
  • 1x Azure Resource Group:
    Note: A RG is a logical container used to regroup Azure resources associated to an application. It provides the centralized management and monitoring of these resources (lifecycle, cost calculation, provisioning, access control …)


name

type

location

RG-TCLAB1 Resource Group West Europe
  • 1x Azure Storage Account (required to host VM VHDX):

name

type

resource group

account type

tclab1storage Storage Account RG-TCLAB1 Standard-LRS (Locally Redundant)
  • 1x Virtual Network (VNET) with three subnets:

name

type

resource group

address space

subnets

description

tc-lab1-lan Virtual Network RG-TCLAB1 172.16.0.0/16 Prod 172.16.0.0/24 PROD Subnet
Gateway (Azure) 172.16.1.0/29 Used for VPN (P2S or S2S)
Heartbeat 172.16.10.0/24 Cluster /Virtual SAN Heartbeat
  • 2x Cloud Service. Just for reminder all VM in a Cloud Service must have the same number of NIC. So with two CS, I don’t need to create the AD DC VM with the Heartbeat VLAN. In addition CS allow scalability option.

name

type

resource group

description

tc-lab1-cs Cloud Service RG-TCLAB1 Used for basic servers (AD DC …)
tc-lab1-cs-sqlsrv Cloud Service RG-TCLAB1 Used for SQL Servers
  • 3x Virtual Machine

name

type

resource group

dns name

pIP

size

description

l1-dc-1 Virtual Machine RG-TCLAB1 tc-lab1-cs.cloudapp.net 172.16.0.4 Basic A0 (0.25 Core, 0.75 GB) AD DC / DNS Server
l1-sqlfci-1 Virtual Machine RG-TCLAB1 tc-lab1-cs-sqlsrv.cloudapp.net 172.16.0.5 Standard A3 (4 Cores, 7 GB) SQL AlwaysOn FCI Node 1
l1-sqlfci-2 Virtual Machine RG-TCLAB1 tc-lab1-cs-sqlsrv.cloudapp.net 172.16.0.6 Standard A3 (4 Cores, 7 GB) SQL AlwaysOn FCI Node 2
  • The two SQL nodes will be created with two vNIC and two VHDX.

2 – Create a Azure Resource Group

Note about Azure portal: For the moment the migration of Azure portal is in progress. I will use the new portal (in Preview) to do all configuration.

Portal: https://manage.windowsazure.com

New Portal: https://portal.azure.com

Click on “Brows ALL” and select “Resource groups”. Click “Add”:

Enter a Name and select a location (note that the location is important for Azure resources, you have to create resources in the same location). Click “Create” (Pin is to Startboard, a Resource Group is useful to manage your environment):

3 – Create a Azure Virtual Network (VNET)

Click “New”, Select “Networking” and click “Virtual Network”:

Enter a name, select an Address space (you can keep the default 10.0.0.0/16, I change it just for the demonstration).

Enter your first network subnet (172.16.0.0/24) and change the default name. Change the location and click “Create”:

Wait for the creation and select your new VNET:

3.1 Configure an Azure VPN Point-to-site

Note: You can configure a “Site-to-site” VPN (use to connect your On-premise infrastructure) or a “Point-to-site” (use for client connection).

You can connect to your VM through RDP without VPN (P2S), but configured a VPN permits to secure your communication between yours computers and your Azure environment (VNET).

Click on the “VPN connections” tab, select “Point-to-site”, select a subnet (10.0.0.0/24 is the subnet for VPN Clients), check “Create gateway immediately” and click “OK”:

Wait for your Gateway creation (this part can take 10/15 minutes):

Note that a new subnet was automatically create for the Gateway mask /29)

Gateway created:

Configure Certificate authentication

Certificates are used to authenticate VPN clients for point-to-site VPNs.

I will use the traditional “makecert” tool to create Root Certificate. This tools is available in the Windows SDK or in MS Visual Studio (Express or full).

Note that at this time, only self-signed root certificates are supported in Azure

https://www.visualstudio.com/products/visual-studio-express-vs.aspx

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/bg162891.aspx

Install Windows SDK for Windows 8.1:

 

Generate a self-signed root certificate

 

Star a CMD and run (change the CN and the output path):

makecert -sky exchange -r -n "CN=RootTechCoffee101" -pe -a sha1 -len 2048 -ss My "D:\CERT\RootTechCoffee101.cer"

The certificate is created in my personal folder:

Retrieve it:

Go to your VNET and click on Point-to-site. Click on “Manage Certificate”:

Click “Upload” and select your Root certificate created previously:

Check the certificate status:

Download your VPN Client:

Generate a Client Certificate

Start CMD and Run (Change CN and your Root Certificate name):

makecert.exe -n “CN=ClientTechCoffee101” -pe -sky exchange -m 96 -ss My -in “RootTechCoffee101” -is my -a sha1

Check if certificate if OK:

Configure your VPN client

Now we just have to install the VPN client on our workstation, launch the exe (VPN Client) previously downloaded:

The package configure the VPN connection, click on “Networks” and connect to the new VPN:

Check “Do not show …” and click “Continue”:

We are now connected, we can connect to VM with RDP directly with private IP Address.

Note that route are added:

You can check all connected client, from you VNET click on Point-to-site clients:

3.2 Configure additional Subnet

Now we can create additional subnets (here only one: Heartbeat).

name

type

resource group

address space

subnets

description

tc-lab1-lan Virtual Network RG-TCLAB1 172.16.0.0/16 Prod 172.16.0.0/24 PROD Subnet
Gateway (Azure) 172.16.1.0/29 Used for VPN (P2S or S2S)
Heartbeat 172.16.10.0/24 Cluster /Virtual SAN Heartbeat

Go to VNET (tc-lab1-lan) settings.

Note – Overview of Address Space:

Select “Subnets” and click “Add”:

Enter name and subnet for the new subnet (here: Heartbeat):

Click “Save”:

4 – Create a Cloud Service

I will create two CS:

name

type

resource group

description

tc-lab1-cs Cloud Service RG-TCLAB1 Used for basic servers (AD DC …)
tc-lab1-cs-sqlsrv Cloud Service RG-TCLAB1 Used for SQL Servers

Go to Cloud Services and click “Add”:

Enter a name, select your Resource Group and make sure you put the Cloud Service in the same Region as your Virtual Network.

Create a new Cloud Service for SQL Servers:

CS created:

5 – Create a Storage Account

Before you begin provisioning VMs you must create a Storage Account.

Select “NEW\Data + Storage\Storage”:

Enter a name and select your storage model:

Note: Azure Storage pricing – http://azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/pricing/details/storage/

Configure your resource Group and make sure you create the Storage Account in the same Location as your Virtual Network

So now everything is ok and we are ready for VM deployment!

Be careful with your resources location:

6 – Install Azure PowerShell

Azure PowerShell module allow to manage all your Azure environment.

You have to install it because at this time it is the only way to deploy Virtual Machine with multiple NIC/Subnets.

The Azure PowerShell module require Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5.

Download Web installer (recommended): http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkid=320376&clcid=0x409

Or Direct Download Link: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=279888&clcid=0x409

Click Install:

You can also install also the Azure CLI (Command line) Tools:

Link to Azure Script Center:

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/scripts/

6.1 Connect to Azure PowerShell

Start Azure PowerShell:

Enter “Add-AzureAccount” and enter your login information:

Note: Get Azure Cmdlet (get-help Azure)

7 – Create Azure VM DC/DNS

Now we are ready to create VMs. I will create the first VM (AD DC) through GUI and SQL VM through PowerShell (mandatory)

Note: Currently there is a bug with the new Portal, it’s impossible to select the Cloud Service and the VNET during the first VM Creation. Once the first VM is created, you can create all other VM through the new portal.

Issue overview:

During the creation of the first VM , when you select your Cloud Service:

VNET is not configured and locked:

Go to Azure Portal: https://manage.windowsazure.com

Click “New\Compute\Virtual Machine\From Gallery”:

Select the WS2012R2 Datacenter Image (STANDARD is not available, Windows Server licenses are included):

Enter a name and select the size (this is a DC in a lab so: BASIC A0). Enter a local administrator name and password and click “Next”:

Select the cloud Service and the VNET (with prod subnet => “default”):

Click “Create”:

Just for the issue on the new portal, now if I try to create a new VM from the portal the VNET is correctly configured when I select my cloud Service:

8 – Create Azure VM with multiple NIC (SQL Node)

As I said previously, for the moment the only way to create a VM with multiple networks is through PowerShell.

The way to create an Azure VM though PS is to create a VM Configuration “New-AzureVMConfig” and then create the VM “New-AzureVM).

So, first select a VM image from Azure VM image gallery. Note that images change frequently (new updates included …). The first command bellow automatically selects the last published Image of WS2012R2 DTC:

# Retrieve VM Image (last version)
$image = (Get-AzureVMImage -Verbose:$false | Where-Object {$_.label -like “Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter*”}| Sort-Object –Descending PublishedDate)[0]
$image | ft Label,PublishedDate
## Other Options ##

#List available images
Get-AzureVMImage -Verbose:$false | where-object { $_.Label -like "Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter*"} | fl Label,ImageName,PublishedDate
$image = Get-AzureVMImage -Verbose:$false | where-object { $_.Label -like "Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter, June 2015"} | fl Label,ImageName

#Use the StarWind VirtualSan Image (require a "Pay-as-you-go" subscription"
$image = Get-AzureVMImage -Verbose:$false | where-object { $_.Label -like "starwindperhour" }  # or "starwindbyol

Note: I use the WS2012R2 image, but the StarWind Virtual SAN VM is available in the Azure Marketplace (http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/marketplace/partners/starwind/starwindvirtualsan-starwindbyol/). The access (through PowerShell) to this image require a “Pay-as-you-go” or an “MSDN” subscription.

Marketplace VM overview:

Next, specify the VM name, the size and configure the default administrator account:

Note: To retrieve InstanceSize value go to: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-machines-size-specs/

Note: Multiple NIC is not supported on all VM sizes. You cannot use “Basic” VM size and for “Standard” the minimum is AXX. For more information go to:

For SQL VM, I will use the A3 Standard size.

# Configure VM
#  * Note: To retieve VM Size values go to: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-machines-size-specs/

$vm = New-AzureVMConfig -Name "l1-sqlfci-1" -InstanceSize "Large" -Image $image.ImageName -AvailabilitySetName "AVS-SQLSrv"

# Create the default administrator login.
Add-AzureProvisioningConfig –VM $vm -Windows -AdminUserName "tcadmin" -Password "xxxxx" 

Now we can configure VM NICs. First we set the first NIC on the default subnet with a static IP and then we add a new NIC connected to the Heartbeat subnet:

Note about StaticIP:

In Azure, a Static IP is not like a DHCP reservation. This mean that set a static IP in a VNET will ensures the VM will attempt to be assigned the correct IP address at provisioning time but it is no guarantee.

# Configure the default NIC
Set-AzureSubnet -SubnetNames "default" -VM $vm
Set-AzureStaticVNetIP -IPAddress "172.16.0.5" -VM $vm

# Add additional NICs to the VM configuration.
Add-AzureNetworkInterfaceConfig -Name "Ethernet1" -SubnetName "Heartbeat" -StaticVNetIPAddress "172.16.10.5" -VM $vm

Create the VM:

# Create the VM
New-AzureVM -ServiceName "tc-lab1-cs-sqlsrv" -Location "West Europe" –VNetName "tc-lab1-lan" –VMs $vm 


Note about Warning “The specified DNS name is already taken” from O’Reilly book:


Repeat the operation to create the second SQL Server:

8.1 – Resources Overview in Azure

If you go to your Cloud Services, you can have a view of VM Status:

Or through PowerShell, you can use:

# Get VM Status
get-azurevm | ft ServiceName,Name,Status,IpAddress,PowerState,InstanceSize,AvailabilitySetName -AutoSize

You can also manage all your resources from your Resource Group:

8.2 – Attach Disk to VM

Now I will create one new VHDX for each SQL Server.

Select the first SQL server and open Settings. Select “Disk” and click “Attach New

Repeat the same operation for the second SQL Server

Prepare Disk:

Note: Each of the arrays which will be used by StarWind Virtual SAN to store virtual disk images has to meet the following requirements:

  • Initialized as GPT
  • Have a single NTFS-formatted partition
  • Have a drive letter assigned

So on each SQL Server, initialize new disk:

And create a new Volume:

9 – Create Active Directory FOREST

Connect to the AD DC/DNS Server and add roles (AD DS & DNS Server):

Promote DC and create forest:

Add-WindowsFeature -Name "AD-Domain-Services,DNS,GPMC" -IncludeManagementTools

# AD DS Deployment
Import-Module ADDSDeployment
Install-ADDSForest `
-CreateDnsDelegation:$false `
-DatabasePath "C:\Windows\NTDS" `
-DomainMode "Win2012R2" `
-DomainName "tclab1.corp" `
-DomainNetbiosName "TCLAB1" `
-ForestMode "Win2012R2" `
-InstallDns:$true `
-LogPath "C:\Windows\NTDS" `
-NoRebootOnCompletion:$false `
-SysvolPath "C:\Windows\SYSVOL" `
-Force:$true
-safemodeadministratorpassword (convertto-securestring "Password1" -asplaintext -force)

9.1 – Create a new GPO

Basically, I configure at minimal three settings on all servers:

Windows Firewall (Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Network\Network Connections\Windows Firewall\Domain Profile\)

Enable:

  • Windows Firewall: Allow Inbound File and printer sharing exception
  • Windows Firewall: Allow Inbound Remote Administration exception

DNS Suffix

Go to “Computer Configuration | Policies | Administrative Templates | Network | DNS Client” and set the Primary DNS Suffix value:

10 – Finalyze SQL Server basic configuration

10.1 – Join Computer to Domain

Rename NIC:

Note that if you Stop VM through the Azure Portal (Status: Stopped (Deallocated), NICs will be reinitialized. This will not occurs if you just stop VM through OS.

Configure DNS IP:

And add computer to domain:

10.2 – Install Windows Features

Install .NET 3.5 Framework (required for SQL 2012/2014) and WSFC cluster features:

# For remote install add: -ComputerName <Hostname>

Install-WindowsFeature Net-Framework-Core,Failover-Clustering -IncludeManagementTools
Install-WindowsFeature Multipath-IO

OK, now the environment is ready. In the next step I will configure the Virtual SAN product to create clustered disk and install a SQL Cluster (AlwaysOn FCI)

Next Steps: SQL AlwaysOn FCI (Failover Cluster Instance) in IaaS Azure Cloud with StarWind Virtual SAN Solution

11 – LINK

Configure a Point-to-Site VPN connection to an Azure Virtual Network

https://azure.microsoft.com/fr-fr/documentation/articles/vpn-gateway-point-to-site-create/

How to Create and Deploy a Cloud Service

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/cloud-services-how-to-create-deploy/

How to install and configure Azure PowerShell

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/powershell-install-configure/

Downloads – Get the SDKs and command-line tools you need

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/downloads/#cmd-line-tools

Azure Script Center

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/scripts/

Install and Configure the Azure CLI

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/xplat-cli/

Install the Azure CLI

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/xplat-cli-install/

Using the Azure CLI for Mac, Linux, and Windows with Azure Service Management

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-machines-command-line-tools/

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Deploy and add Network Controller to Virtual Machine Manager https://www.tech-coffee.net/deploy-and-add-network-controller-to-virtual-machine-manager/ https://www.tech-coffee.net/deploy-and-add-network-controller-to-virtual-machine-manager/#comments Fri, 21 Aug 2015 13:15:12 +0000 https://www.tech-coffee.net/?p=3792 Network Controller is a new feature which will be available with Windows Server 2016. This feature enables to manage centrally the virtual and the physical network infrastructure to automate the management, configuration monitoring and troubleshooting. After a quick overview about network controller, I’ll explain how to deploy network controller and how to connect it to ...

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Network Controller is a new feature which will be available with Windows Server 2016. This feature enables to manage centrally the virtual and the physical network infrastructure to automate the management, configuration monitoring and troubleshooting. After a quick overview about network controller, I’ll explain how to deploy network controller and how to connect it to Virtual Machine Manager.

Network Controller overview

The information and schemas of this section come from here.

Network Controller is a Windows Server 2016 server role which is highly available and scalable. This feature comes with two API:

  • The Southbound API enables to discover devices, detect services configuration and gather network information
  • The Northbound API enables to configure, monitor, troubleshoot and deploy new devices (by REST endpoint or a management application as VMM)

Network Controller is able to manage the following network devices or features :

  • Hyper-V VMs and virtual switches
  • Physical network switches
  • Physical network routers
  • Firewall software
  • VPN gateways (including RRaS)
  • Load Balancers

For more information about Network Controller features you can read this topic (section network controller features)

Deploy Network Controller

Requirements

  • A server (VM or not) running on Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 3 Datacenter;
  • A valid certificate for this server (Server Authentication);

Create Security groups

First, two security groups are required:

  • The first give permissions to configure Network Controller (GG-NetControllerAdmin);
  • The second enables to configure and manage the network by using the network controller (by using REST) (GG-NetControllerRESTAdmin)

Install Network controller feature

To install network controller features, run the following commands:

Install-WindowsFeature -Name NetworkController –IncludeManagementTools
Install-WindowsFeature -Name Windows-Fabric –IncludeManagementTools
Restart-Computer

Once the computer has rebooted, you can open the Server Manager and check if Network Controller is present:


Configure Network Controller

To understand commands and parameters, I recommend you to read this topic.

Currently in Technical Preview 3, the network controller role doesn’t support multi-node cluster. This is why in the following configuration, only one node will be added to the cluster. First I create a node object by using New-NetworkControllerNodeObject cmdlet.

Next I configure the network controller cluster by using the Install-NetworkControllerCluster cmdlet. I specify the node object, an authentication method and the security group that will be able to manage the network controller.

Then I configure network controller by using Install-NetworkController cmdlet. I specify also the node object, the authentication method for the clients and the security group that will be able to configure and manage network from Network Controller (by using REST).

To finish, I verify if my network controller is well configured, run the following commands:

Now that network controller is set and we can connect it to Virtual Machine Manager.

Add network controller to Virtual Machine Manager

To add Network Controller to VMM, you need VMM technical Preview 3.

Open the VMM console and navigate to Fabric. Right click on Network Services and select Add Network Service. Then specify the network service name.

Next select Microsoft as Manufacturer and Microsoft Network Controller as Model.

Then select your RunAs account.

Next specify ServerURL= and the REST Endpoint address. When Network Controller will support multi-node cluster, the SouthBound API address parameter will be mandatory.

Then select the certificate and check the box to specify that certificates have been reviewed.

Next, run Scan provider and verify that information can be gathered as below.

Next select host groups for which the network controller will be available.

When the network controller is added successfully, it should be listed in network services as below.

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Windows Azure Pack – SQL Server in AlwaysOn as a Service https://www.tech-coffee.net/windows-azure-pack-sql-server-in-alwayson-as-a-service/ https://www.tech-coffee.net/windows-azure-pack-sql-server-in-alwayson-as-a-service/#comments Tue, 13 Jan 2015 17:41:35 +0000 https://www.tech-coffee.net/?p=3065 Windows Azure Pack is able to provide Database as a Service to tenants. This service supports SQL Server in high availability using AlwaysOn. So when a tenant uses the service, the database is automatically placed in an AlwaysOn Availability Group. (AAG). In this topic I will show you how to implement this service. Requirements A ...

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Windows Azure Pack is able to provide Database as a Service to tenants. This service supports SQL Server in high availability using AlwaysOn. So when a tenant uses the service, the database is automatically placed in an AlwaysOn Availability Group. (AAG). In this topic I will show you how to implement this service.

Requirements

  • A working SQL Server cluster using AlwaysOn (cf. this topic)
  • A working Windows Azure Pack installation (cf. this topic)

Run this script on each SQL Server node:

sp_configure 'contained database authentication', 1;
GO
RECONFIGURE;
GO

SQL Server extension installation

On each node that hosts admin Windows Azure Pack services, run the Web Platform Installer. Next select Windows Azure Pack: SQL Server Extension and click on Add.

When the configuration webpage is opened, specify your database server settings.

At the end of installation, you should have something as below :

SQL Server group creation

Open your Administrative Console of Windows Azure Pack and navigate to SQL Servers. Navigate to Groups and click on Create a new SQL Server Group. In group type, select High Availability (Always on enabled). Specify a group name and a share to store database backup.

I have created two groups: one called Bronze and the other called Gold.

Add SQL Servers to Windows Azure Pack

Next we have to associate SQL Servers to the groups that we have previously created. So navigate to SQL Servers and select servers. Click on Add a new SQL Server. Specify the group, the AAG listener name, the credentials and size of hosting server.

Repeat the operation to add others SQL Servers.

So in my example I have two groups and two SQL Servers AAG.

Add the service to a hosting plan

Now we have to add the service to a hosting plan. Select a hosting plan and click on Add Service.

Select the SQL Servers service and click on next.

Then click on SQL Servers service to configure it.

Specify the settings regarding your needs and click on ok.

Now the service status should be Active.

Trying the service

To use the service, connect to the tenant portal and click on SQL Server Databases. Then select Add a new database.

Specify a database name and choose an edition.

Specify database credentials and click on ok.

Once the database is created, you can connect to your SQL Server with the management studio and open the AAG dashboard. As you can see below, the database is automatically added to the AAG.

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